Beginner's Guide to Crocheting Part 2 - Stitches

Updated: May 22




In my previous article, I introduced crocheting. I talked about the benefits and basic tools you need to start. In this post, I'll talk about the basic stitches you need to know.


Stitches

There are several basic stitches to master when you start crocheting. Before you start making them, you'll need to create a slip knot. This isn't a stitch, but it forms a loop that you'll start working out of when you crochet your chain. Follow these steps to make a slip knot:


  1. Wrap the yarn around your index finger twice.

  2. Bring the back loop over the front loop.

Now you've created a slip knot.


Chain stitch

The chain stitch is the foundation of any crochet project, and is also used when starting new rows. Follow these steps to make a chain:

  1. Put the hook through the loop.

  2. Wrap the yarn around the hook from back to front - this is referred to as "yarn over."

  3. Pull the yarn through the loop.

Once you've done that, you'll have created a new loop - this is referred to as pulling up a loop. It will become important when you learn more complex stitches. Continue the above directions until your chain is as long as you want it to be.


Single crochet


This is the next stitch that you'll need to know to create many crochet projects. Here are the steps:

  1. Skip the first link in your chain.

  2. Put the hook through the second link.

  3. Yarn over your hook - you'll have two loops on your hook at this point, one from your yarn, and one from the chain.

  4. Bring your yarn through the first loop.

  5. Yarn over again.

  6. Bring the yarn through both loops.

Half double crochet

This is a slightly more complicated stitch. You'll have three loops on your hook, which you'll have to pull the yarn through. Here are the steps:

  1. Make a chain that consists of 17 stitches.

  2. Yarn over your hook and insert your hook in the third chain from the hook.

  3. Yarn over the hook again and pull the hook through the chain stitch on your hook. You should now have three loops on your hook.

  4. Yarn over the hook and draw the yarn through all three loops on your hook.

  5. Repeat the steps above for each of the chain stitches left in your chain.

Double crochet

This is the next longest of the basic stitches. You'll have four loops on your hook, which you'll have to pull your yarn through two at a time. Here are the steps:

  1. Yarn over and put the hook in the fourth chain from the hook.

  2. Yarn over and pull through the chain. You should have three loops on the hook.

  3. Yarn over and pull through two of the loops on the hook.

  4. Yarn over again and pull through the last two loops on the hook. You've just finished one double crochet.

  5. Repeat the steps above for each of the stitches left in your chain.

Treble crochet

This is the longest of the basic stitches. You'll have five loops on your hook, which you'll have to pull through your yarn. Here are the steps:

  1. Yarn over twice and put the hook in the fifth chain from the hook.

  2. Yarn over again and pull the yarn through. You'll pull up a loop.

  3. Yarn over again and pull the yarn only through the first two loops on your hook.

  4. Yarn over again and pull the yarn through the next two loops on the hook.

  5. Yarn over again and pull the yarn through the last two loops.

You've now made one treble crochet stitch. Yarn over twice and place the hook into the next stitch. Repeat the steps above starting at step 2.


How to crochet in rows without using a turning chain


If you want to crochet in rows using turning chains, that's fine. But some people don't like the gaps and wavy edges turning chains can leave. The solution is to use a chainless foundation on the second and subsequent rows:


For the single crochet:

  1. Put your yarn in the first single crochet stitch.

  2. Yarn over and pull up a loop. You'll have two loops on the hook after you complete this step.

  3. Yarn over and pull the yarn through the first loop on your hook. The yarn you just pulled through is actually a chain stitch. If you have stitch markers, or something you can use as a stitch marker, put it in that chain stitch so you don't forget.

  4. Yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook to make a single crochet. You should have one loop on your hook after this step.

  5. Repeat the process for all the stitches in that row, and all additional rows you crochet.

For the half double crochet:

  1. Stretch the loop on the hook until it is slightly longer than a regular half double crochet. Put a stitch marker around the stretched loop and hold it on the back of your hook with your finger.

  2. Yarn over with the stretched loop on your hook once. Insert the hook into the same stitch the loop is coming from. Yarn over and pull up a loop.

  3. Yarn over again, then pull through all three loops.

For the double crochet:

  1. Stretch a loop on the hook until it is slightly longer than a regular half double crochet.

  2. Holding the top of the loop still with your finger, yarn over with the stretched loop on your hook once.

  3. Insert the hook into the same stitch the loop is coming from. Yarn over and pull up a loop.

  4. Yarn over and pull through the two loops on the hook twice.

For the treble crochet:

  1. Stretch the loop on the hook until it’s slightly longer than a regular treble crochet.

  2. Holding the top of the loop still with your finger, yarn over the stretched loop on your hook twice.

  3. Insert the hook into the same stitch the loop is coming from.

  4. Yarn over and pull up a loop.

  5. Yarn over again and pull through the two loops on the hook three times.


That’s it for this article. In the next article, we’ll talk about some more advanced crochet techniques, such as crocheting in the round, increasing, and decreasing. In the meantime, if you want to check out some more crochet advice, along with some pictures of the crocheting I've done, feel free to follow my Pinterest board:


https://www.pinterest.com/emartin74/crochet-information/



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